Hot and spicy chili pepper soup, Tteokbokki inspired

Are you feeling the chill, like we do in Norway right now? Why not try this hot and spicy Korean chili soup. It is perfect for this type of weather, chilly and humid.

I first encountered this soup when I lived in Pusan, South Korea but did not learn to make it untill I was back in Norway.

Korean chili soup, Tteokbokki

I was invited to a cooking class held by the Korean embassy in Oslo. We made Japchea sweet potato starch noodle stir fry and Tteokbokki(떡볶이) a spicy korean rice cake dish.

Tteokbokki 떡볶이

This dish is Tteokbokki inspired, I have not been able to find all the ingredients like tteok and odeng, the rice cakes and fish cakes used. I did however find some doable replacements. I think I have to try to make tteok one day and make this soup properly.Tteokbokki, korean chili soup

The heat in this soup comes from the fermented chili paste used(gochujang,고추장) and chili flakes.

Gochujang is a savory, spicy, and fermented Korean condiment made from red chili, glutinous rice, fermented soybeans, and salt.

The embassy chef instructed us on how to make this dish and showed us how to make the simple broth used. She boiled some dried anchovies in water and strained it and voila, broth.

Chili soup 2 agj

Ingredients:

400 g rice flake/cake or of tteok
200 g fish balls or odeng(korean fish cakes)
3 scallions
2 eggs
Seasoning
2 tbsp chili pepper paste
1 tbsp chili pepper flakes
1 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp minced garlic
Anchovy stock or some light broth( 1 liter water 1 dl dried anchovies)

Anchovi stock agj

Boil the eggs for 8-10 minutes.

Make anchovy stock by cooking anchovies in water for about 10 minutes, remove the anchovies.

Add the seasoning to the broth.

Asian Fsh balls agj

Bring to a boil, when this is boiling add the fish balls and rice flakes. Turn down the heat to medium. Cut scallions crosswise and add them to the soup.

Chili pepper soup 3 agj

Let this boil for a minute or so, enough for the scallions to soften slightly but not lose its colour. Pour the soup into serving bowls and add the eggs, the serve and enjoy the heat.

Hot spcy vinegar, Suka na maanghang

Suka na maanghang in Baybayin

Chicharron is a snack that is popular in every country with spanish heritage and probably has hundreds of regional variations. In the Philippines though a must have condiment with chicharron, is hot and spicy vinegar.

As a kid on vacation in the Philippines chicharron is one of the snacks I always bought. I can remember buying chicharron from vendors in the the Philippines and they often came with a tub with hot and spicy vinegar.

One of the tell tell signs to spot a Filipino is the persons love of vinegar. Being filipino I love the taste of vinegar:)

500 ml sugar cane vinegar
20 pcs. red and green Thai chilies
1 whole head garlic, peeled
1 tbsp. whole peppercorns
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. sugar

In a saucepan, combine the vinegar, salt and sugar. Bring to a light simmer and mix until the salt and sugar are dissolved. Set aside to cool a bit.

Thoroughly wash the chilies and cut the stems before putting them inside the bottle.

Press the garlic cloves with the side of the knife to lightly crush allowing the flavors to come out. Put them inside the bottle

Put the whole peppercorns inside the bottle

With a funnel pour the warm vinegar into the bottle. Allow to completely cool at room temperature and seal the bottle with a cork.

Steep for a couple of days before using. The vinegar can be stored inside the fridge for several months. The flavors of the spices will intensifies the longer it is kept.

So get a bag of chicharron or some kind of pork rind snack and enjoy them with hot and spicy vinegar.

Ike’s Vietnamese Fish Sauce Wings

I got very curious when I read about these wings on this Blog 

I had to try to make it so I googled the recipe, I have never been to the Restaurant in Portland Oregon that serves them and never had them roadside from a stall in Saigon, so I do not know if they taste the same. But I can tell you that we love them, even picky eater MiniMe loves them.

I found the recipe HERE The story is that Ike carried this recipe around with him until he opened his restaurant Pok PokI have made these wings a few times since I first posted them on my norwegian blog back in October 31. 2011, and I have even made the dish with pork.

I tried the wings with just the syrup and it was very sweet and salty, and then I tasted a wing with the syrup, crispy garlic, chopped cilantro, mint and chili. WOW what a flavor bomb and I highly recommended that you try to make these.

Dan: Mum, it is so strange, that dish really stinks, but it is really yummy. I knew that you were making this dish, I could smell it outside.

We eat this with plain jasmine rice and a salad of shredded cucumber, mango (sour / sweet), chopped green onion and a little salt and pepper, to balance the salty wings.

I doubled the coriander and mint,and added chili.

  • 1/2 cup Asian fish sauce
  • 1/2 cup superfine sugar
  • 4 garlic cloves, 2 crushed and 2 minced
  • 3 pounds chicken wings, split at the drumettes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for frying
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoon chopped fresh coriander
  • 2 tablespoon chopped mint
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chili
  1. In a bowl, whisk the fish sauce, sugar and crushed garlic. Add the wings and toss to coat. Refrigerate for 3 hours, tossing the wings occasionally.
  2. Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a small skillet. Add the minced garlic; cook over moderate heat until golden, 3 minutes. Drain on paper towels.
  3. In a large pot, heat 2 inches of oil to 350°. Pat the wings dry on paper towels; reserve the marinade. Put the cornstarch in a shallow bowl, add the wings and turn to coat. Fry the wings in batches until golden and cooked through, about 10 minutes. Drain on paper towels and transfer to a bowl.
  4. In a small saucepan, simmer the marinade over moderately high heat until syrupy, 5 minutes. Strain over the wings and toss. Top with the cilantro, mint, fried garlic and chili.

Kimchi jjiggae, Kimchi stew, 김치찌개

 

Kimchi jjiggae  is one of the most popular all the stews in Korean cuisine and is made from mature kimchi, tofu, and meat or seafood. It is a warm, hearty, spicy and savory dish. When ever we were out eating korean bbq we often got a bowl of this stew and a bowl of rice at the end of the meal.

There are many variations of this dish as each household uses their own favorite ingredients.

This is my version and I used what I had available.
It is not always easy to make Korean food in Norway although many immigrant stores are pretty well stocked with exotic food, but Korean products are sadly scares.
I was out of gochujang, so I have replaced it with something called kimchi base that I have found in one of the local immigrant shops.

400 g thinly cut rib eye or the type of meat you want to use
1 tablespoon sesame oil
5 dl kimchi
0.5 dl kimchi brine
1/2 chopped onion
2 cloves crushed garlic
1 tbsp gochujang/kimchi base
1-2 tsp gochugaru or cayenne pepper
7.5 dl water
1/2 package tofu
2 sliced scallions

In a heavy bottomed saute the beef, garlic and the onions, when the onions are glossy add kimchi and keep sauteing until the mixture is very fragrant.
Add the kimchi juice, water, chili paste, chili flakes and drizzle sesame oil, stir everything together to combine.
Bring to a boil and taste for spiciness, adjust with gochugaru to increase the heat to where you want it. Add the tofu, turn down the heat to a simmer and let it cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the beef and kimchi are tender.
When you’re ready to serve the kimchi jjiggae, add the green onions. Put the pot on the tablet and serve it with rice.